Former media baron Peter Mukerjea on Sunday came out with his memoir, which he termed as a recollection of his experiences in the media industry, further saying it was not intended to open a can of worms or narrate a series of kiss-and-tell stories, PTI reported. ‘Starstruck: Confessions of a TV executive’, the book, will largely zoom on the Indian television industry and the changes it has gone through over the years.

The former Chief Executive of Star India, who was reportedly US media personality Rupert Murdoch’s close aid in the TV industry of the region, said the memoir attempted to exclusively share his journey.

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"It is intended purely to share my journey, to highlight and showcase the plenty of mistakes made and the plenty of lessons learnt over almost three decades," Mukerjea was quoted as saying by PTI.

The book reportedly catalogues in length the change of Star, a miniscule foreign-owned TV channel, into the billion-dollar behemoth of a network that it became, a job that Mukerjea was statedly tasked with by Murdoch.

"This book is a memoir. No more than that. It is a personal recollection of my experiences at the coalface in the formative years of the satellite television industry in India and a super-fast-changing media landscape. This is not intended to open a can of worms, nor is it a set of kiss-and-tell stories," he further said.

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The early 90s saw dominance of US television shows the world over, but its restriction into the one billion-strong Indian audience was blocked off by terrestrial television systems, which was soon to change because of changes the Indian consumers themselves went through eventually.

Statedly, a ready access to television shows that were closer to global standards kept the audience glued to their screens, making television, in itself, a catalyst for the change, prior to which, according to Mukerjea, neither Murdoch nor Star founder Richard Li considered the South Asian nation to be a possible market.

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